#DropThePlus - Fashion should not be measured in size



There was never a time in my life when my mother ever told me that I should be skinny to look beautiful in the clothes I wear.  Oh no.  My mother taught me to always be clean and to wear clothing that is timeless and that you can wear more than once without people noticing it too much.  So it is without a doubt that my mommy has the largest influence on the style I have today.

It is so sad that the time we live in, girls are being bombarded with images of fashion models, most likely 1.75 meters and taller, in a size 2 or 0.  People often want to know what the real size of beauty is and what is considered to be “fat” and “skinny”. 

In some countries a woman will be considered plus size when she is size 10, 12 and bigger.  In that case I will also be considered plus size.  The word itself might be embarrassing to other women but who cares? Of course there was a time in my life when I considered myself healthier looking than I am now, but why let other people influence the image you have of yourself? 










Elle recently posted an article online of models that want to change the perception there is about the term “plus sized”. There are Australian models who would like to change the stigma that is associated with “plus size” for the sake of women everywhere.  Another Australian model, Laura Wells was recently part of the launch of the popular active wear label, The Upside.  The initiative of the Be You campaign launched by The Upside encourages women to “be at home in their own skin” and give them more confidence.  Laura is proud to be part of this advertisement and had the following to say:
“I find it interesting that The Upside has previously used Candice Swanepoel, a Victoria’s Secret model [in their ads], and now they’re using a ‘plus size’ model.”

“It’s fantastic for them to show that yes, our clothes look great on a Victoria’s Secret model. But look how great they also look on people of all sizes.”

“It’s very daring, but at the same time, it’s something that should be seen as normal. The fact that we have to celebrate is a bit sad.”
My body is relatable and aspirational to a lot of people. There are a lot of models that we see every day in magazines and high fashion and it’s not always achievable for a lot of people to look like that. They say, ‘Oh I can’t look like that.”

“I am between 3-6 sizes larger than a normal, industry standard model.”
My body is relatable and aspirational to a lot of people. There are a lot of models that we see every day in magazines and high fashion and it’s not always achievable for a lot of people to look like that. They say, ‘Oh I can’t look like that.”

“I am between 3-6 sizes larger than a normal, industry standard model.”

From the media, to friends and family - women are so easily being told that they do not fit in with the picture of society, but that is so not true.  I would love it when women felt more comfortable in their skin and if they could walk down the sidewalk each and every day with confidence knowing that how they look and feel is entirely up to them.
 
Isaac Mizrahi: "I don't like segregation, I like incorporation."
During an interview with HuffPost Live, Mizrahi expressed his disinterest in what he called the "segregation" that plus-size shoppers and models experience. "I don't want to speak to a plus-sized woman differently than I speak to a woman," he said, adding, "I don't like segregation, I like incorporation, I like integration. If you're going to do clothes, you need to do them in a whole size range."


Tanesha Awasthi of Girl With Curves: Bloggers should be labelled as bloggers.
In an interview with Who What Wear, Awasthi spoke about the future of plus-size. As a blogger, she mentioned her "frustration" with being labelled as a "plus-size blogger." She said, "One day I hope the blogging community at large will recognize fashion bloggers as bloggers and not lump us into size categories."


Ivan Bart, IMG Models Senior Vice President and Managing Director: "We want to be an ageless, race-less, weightless agency."
IMG made news when they added models like Ashley Graham and Julie Henderson to its roster. Though these women were traditionally pegged as "plus-size," IMG made the revolutionary choice to keep the models in line with other talents, such as Gisele Bundchen. Bart told Cosmopolitan, "We want to be an ageless, race-less, weightless agency," and added, "We just want to represent the best people in the industry."
So ladies forget what the media says about your size, #DropThePlus and look and feel good in the clothing you wear – no matter the size!

C
xxx



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